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Tips for managing caregiving responsibilities among siblings.

Sisters with Mom

Tips for managing caregiving responsibilities among siblings

Caring for aging parents or relatives is no easy responsibility. It can be one of the most challenging roles you play. If you are an only child or relative to a senior and helping them manage care, it can be a heavy burden to bear alone. However, when there are multiple siblings or family members who play a part in care management, the waters can be even trickier to navigate.

Here are three tips for overseeing the care of your aging senior along with siblings or family members.

1) Start early

Benjamin Franklin said it best, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

If you can start discussions with your siblings even before Mom and Dad need a lot of (or any) care, you’ll start off on the right foot. You’ll likely head off many future arguments. 

In many families, when parents start requiring care, the adult children will either fall into their own assumptions about roles of caregiving (for example, the daughter does the caretaking, while the son covers it financially) or play into the “type” they were in childhood (for example, Sarah was the “responsible” child so she takes on care, while Claire was the “spontaneous” one and can’t handle helping at all.)

The problem with this is that it doesn’t take into consideration the current situation, strengths, or abilities of each person. Even if Sarah was the “responsible” one as a child, perhaps now she has a child of her own with disabilities who requires a lot of care.

Even if you can start the conversation of “What do you think taking care of Mom and Dad would look like for us?” that will set you up for future discussions. When the time comes for a serious plan to be put in place, you should arrange a family meeting with all those who would be involved (siblings, close friends, other relatives). 

When examining the situation and deciding solutions, be as specific as possible. Write down all the responsibilities and requirements of caregiving. When you’re deciding who should do what, be sure to take into account your own strengths, abilities, and limitations.

Another topic to review early on is any legal documents or decisions your parents have already made, such as a living will (also known as a healthcare direction) or power of attorney, and whether or not a will has been completed. It’s also important to know the location of these documents.

The key to everything is communication. One meeting or conversation is not enough. It’s an on-going process.

2) Develop your self-awareness

When it comes to caregiving, especially when it’s your own parents, there are a lot of emotions involved. Adjusting to the role reversal is difficult for most adult children, then added on are the everyday stresses of “normal life”, too. So, you’ll be experiencing a range of emotions, and then have to work together with other people, who you may be very close with or not so much. This situation is a stimulus for arguments.

Without being aware of and understanding your own emotions, you will simply react according to what your feelings tell you. This leads to acting out, yelling, blaming, and possibly even disengagement. None of these are productive for helping your loved one get the care they need.

Ask yourself questions about why you feel a certain way and what else might be causing it. Perhaps some old sibling rivalries are coming out again. Some clues that you might be acting out of feelings or fighting old battles include using phrases such as “You always do this!” or criticizing the way a sibling feels, such as “You donʼt care anything about Mom.” 
In these moments, in order to be able to switch to a more productive discussion, you have to be able to identify, pause, and adjust your mind and words. It’s a simple reminder, but try to pause and breath before you say the next thing. Then refocus back on the question or goal at hand.

If you find yourself really struggling, such as every discussion with your siblings turns into a heated argument, you might want to consider professional help. Even if your family doesn’t want to go to therapy together, going alone for yourself can be tremendously constructive. There is no shame in asking for help. When you are better able to manage yourself, your parents will win as well.

3) Discuss with your family how you will address problems

For someone who is conscientious and self-aware, it might come as a surprise to learn that not everyone is proactive about fixing or improving relationships. For example, many people just assume, “That’s just the way Sally is.” or “This is just how we interact.” It may never occur to them that if two people don’t get along they can take steps to improve their interactions.

As you get started on this caregiving journey, it could be helpful to ask your siblings, “If a problem arises among us, how should we resolve it?” You could also approach it as, “What would be the best way for me to discuss a problem with you?” showing that your primary concern is their feelings.

If you feel like you don’t make progress with that strategy, you could simply demonstrate it by saying, “If at any point you feel frustrated or hurt by something that I’ve done, please let me know so that I can correct it or not do it again.”

Another consideration is how each family member will alert the others about problems and how solutions will be made. For example, if you’re at an appointment with your Dad, and the doctor notices a decline and wants to adjust medication or treatment, how will you communicate it to your siblings? How will a decision be made? If you have established the process (for example, first you alert the others by sending an email to everyone providing the basic information, and then a family call or meeting is scheduled), there will be no surprises. No one will be left out. Furthermore, when people know what to look for, they’ll be less likely to miss important communications.

As humans, we’re bound to have disagreements, and in caregiving, there will almost definitely be problems. By addressing the situation early on, being aware of your emotions, and developing a process for resolving issues, you and your siblings will be better able to keep your focus on your parents and helping them to be as healthy and happy as possible.

If you have a senior living alone or far away, it’s likely that you feel concerned about their safety. Even with the diligence of several siblings taking care of mom and dad, it’s important to help reduce risks and increase safety in their living space. You can use our Senior At-Home Safety Checklist, which is a free comprehensive home safety checklist that will help you systematically go through each area of the home to check for common hazards and make sure the proper safety measures are in place. 
If you think your parents or relative would benefit from non-medical in-home care, you can learn more about our services here.

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1Russo, Francine. (2011). Caregiving with Your Siblings: As a Family, Carefully Consider—or Reconsider—the Caregiving Responsibilities. Family Caregiver Alliance. https://www.agingcare.com/articles/sibling-relationships-resolving-issues-while-caring-for-parents-2 03842.htm 

2 Family Caregiver Alliance. (2003). Holding a Family Meeting. https://www.caregiver.org/holding-family-meeting
3 National Institute on Aging. (May 09, 2017). How to Share Caregiving Responsibilities with Family Members.h ttps://www.nia.nih.gov/health/how-share-caregiving-responsibilities-family-members
 

4 Samuels, Claire. (April 25, 2020). How to Stop Family Disputes Over Elderly Parents: End-of-life care and inheritance conflicts emerge https://www.aplaceformom.com/caregiver-resources/articles/family-disputes
5 Bradley Bursack, Carol. (2016). Sibling Relationships: Resolving Issues While Caring for Parents: The Powerful Emotions Involved in Caregiving. https://www.agingcare.com/articles/sibling-relationships-resolving-issues-while-caring-for-parents-2 03842.htm
 

6 Russo, Francine. (2011). Caregiving with Your Siblings: Clues That You Are Acting out of Emotional Needs or Fighting Old Battles . https://www.agingcare.com/articles/sibling-relationships-resolving-issues-while-caring-for-parents-2 03842.htm 

7 ibid

Helping your senior loved one use technology

5 Specialty Home Health Services That Can Help Seniors

Have you ever sat in the cockpit of a plane? Or perhaps you can picture a movie scene of a pilot sitting in the chair, flicking on switches, turning knobs, preparing for take-off.

As an outsider, someone who isn’t a pilot, your reaction to looking at the dashboard of a plane is probably something of overwhelm. What do all those buttons, knobs, lights, and screens even mean? How can anyone make sense of this?!

If you ever were sat down in front of this dashboard and told to operate it, you probably wouldn’t even know where to begin.

Well, for many seniors, this is the experience of using a computer or tablet or smartphone. 

Technology is a wonderful tool. This year has shown us the amazing ways that the internet and all these gadgets can not only keep us connected but also keep us working and learning.

However, many seniors haven’t taken advantage of these benefits of technology because the learning curve is so steep. What is disheartening about this is that right now seniors are the population most in need of new ways to stay in touch with friends and family.

The outlook doesn’t have to be so bleak, however, because it is possible for seniors to learn how to use technology and thus stay in touch with the people who love them. 

If you have a senior in your life who lives alone or lives further away or who simply doesn’t want to go out or have visitors right now, here are tips for teaching them how to use technology.

  1. Keep it simple. 

While you may enjoy replying to emails, setting your fantasy lineup for the week, checking the weather, and crushing candy to pass time all on your phone, your senior loved one probably doesn’t need to do all those things. 

When you are selecting a device for them, keep it simple. It’s better to go with a device that does a core set of functionality well and is reliable over one that can do everything but is more complicated. The main things that a senior might want to do with a device are make video calls, receive pictures, listen to music, and play basic games. Making and receiving video calls is probably the most important, so focus on that and find a device that can use a software that is very straightforward.

  1. Don’t assume anything.

The number one mistake people make when teaching a senior to use technology is that they assume a base level of technical knowledge. For people who have used computers for years, or even their whole life, they forget that it’s not just “second nature”, it’s something they learned.

Even something as “basic” as how to use a mouse might need to be explained. Some other commonly mistaken “second nature” understandings about devices are:

  • Overlapping windows. When a new screen appears, it’s not always understood that other screens are below it.
  • Nested menus. The fact that there are more options listed under the word “File” might have to be explained.
  • Power off versus sleep mode. This is important if you want your senior to be able to receive calls, which means the device has to be on. Many seniors will assume they need to turn it all the way off to preserve battery life.
  • Storage. Be sure to explain how they can access and use different things on the device, such as pictures or word documents.

The key is to ask if they are understanding and to keep things in everyday terms. Analogies will be very helpful in explaining these new concepts.

  1. Be mindful of physical differences.

The thing about aging is that it affects both the mind and body. Many seniors struggle with using their fingers due to arthritis or other diseases. A touchscreen device may not be best because maybe their hand shakes or they don’t have enough strength to hold up their arm. A more traditional computer with a mouse might be better. 

Hearing is another area to consider. If they use hearing aids, be mindful of the levels and frequencies of sound coming from the device. Ask the senior if it sounds okay for them.

  1. Have patience.

Above all, it’s important to have patience. It might be frustrating to have to explain something multiple times and on multiple occasions. If you feel yourself getting agitated, just remember the plane’s dashboard and consider how long it would take you to understand that.

You are probably busy and have errands to run or work to do, but just remember the benefits of what you’re enabling them to do. You’re giving them access to a whole new world. Loneliness is not just an emotional concern, but it can also lead to other significant health issues in seniors. By empowering them to use technology, you are enriching their life and increasing their overall well-being.

If you have a senior living alone or far away, it’s likely that you feel concerned about their safety. To help reduce risks and increase safety in their living space, you can also use our Senior At-Home Safety Checklist. Our free comprehensive home safety checklist will help you systematically go through each area of the home to check for common hazards and make sure the proper safety measures are in place. 

Download this checklist once and use it over again periodically to make sure your loved one’s home stays as safe as possible.

Where to Find Home Health Services in Pennsylvania

Where to Find Home Health Services in Pennsylvania

As family members get older, it may become difficult for them to continue living entirely on their own. Health concerns, diminished mobility, and cognitive decline are all factors to consider when deciding when older family members need living assistance. Contrary to popular belief, there are options other than traditional nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Depending on the level of care required, some seniors can remain at home with the help of home care services. River Oaks Home Care is dedicated to helping Seniors continue to experience the richness of life in the comfort of their own home.

Allowing seniors to remain in their homes can produce better outcomes than moving them into a nursing home or assisted living facility. Home health care for seniors used to be the kind of thing that only the wealthy could afford. However, an increase in the number of trained home health professionals has led to more affordable prices. River Oaks Home Care provides high-quality home services for seniors that are effective and less expensive than other forms of managed care.

River Oaks Home Care has home health aides who improve the quality of life for seniors through professional, hands-on care and compassionate kindness. Often, our clients consider their home health aide or caregiver to be a trusted friend. We have a diverse pool of associates, so we always have someone with the skill set you need. Depending on the training, home health aides can administer a client’s medication or check vital signs, change bandages or dressings, and or provide skilled health care as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) or Patient Care Assistant (PCA).

Home health aides can also help around the house in a variety of ways. They can assist with tasks such as bathing, dressing, meal preparation, grocery shopping, and light housekeeping. Our home health aides can stop by for companionship visits, give the client a ride to appointments, and more. River Oaks Home Care does everything possible to help improve the health and quality of life of seniors.

River Oaks Home Care can also provide care for seniors who are experiencing the effects of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Our attendants provide specialized, non-medical Alzheimer’s care that can allow seniors in the early and middle stages of the disease to remain at home. More than half of all diagnosed Alzheimer’s patients continue to live in home settings. River Oaks Home Care staff can help with responsibilities (e.g., daily orientation to time, place, and person) that can overwhelm family and friends who are assisting the senior.

Our specialty Alzheimer’s care services utilize a customized care regimen that will take into account the environment and unique needs of seniors, which makes their lives less difficult and stressful compared to moving them into a nursing home or assisted living facility. Other advantages include staying in the home that provides a familiar frame of reference, the freedom to move about in a more casual and unrestricted space, reduced stress which aggravates dementia symptoms, and continuity of daily routines and schedules.

Home health care services are more affordable than people assume. You can request a free quote for the services you need from our website. If you have any questions about getting home health services for your family member, send us a message online.

5 Specialty Home Health Services That Can Help Seniors

5 Specialty Home Health Services That Can Help Seniors

Most people know that it’s possible to get home health care services to help seniors with basic living assistance. As more Americans reach their golden years, home health care services are a popular way to keep older loved ones living at home instead of a managed care facility. However, many people have a limited view of how much can be done via home health care. By hiring high-trained professionals, River Oaks Home Care can assist in various situations. Here are five specialty health services that River Oaks Home Care can provide for seniors at home.

Alzheimer’s and Other Related Dementia Home Care

As adults get older, they may experience cognitive declines as a result of Alzheimer’s Disease or dementia. These conditions make it harder for seniors to live on their own independently, but these conditions don’t automatically make it necessary to use a nursing home or assisted living facility. During the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, patients can remain at home so long as they get some assistance with daily responsibilities. Home health aides from River Oaks Home Care can help seniors stay in their familiar environment as long as possible, which can improve their quality of life.

Hypertension/Stroke Recovery Home Care

Following a stroke, patients may have diminished cognitive and physical function that make care and assistance necessary. However, home health aides from places like River Oaks Home Care give stroke survivors more options for living independently at home. Having help from a home health aide can help seniors recover from a stroke with no minor or long-term effects. Trained home health aides can assist with physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and their companionship can help provide mental health support. Our aides can also help patients with hypertension (i.e., high blood pressure) manage their condition to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Heart Disease Home Care

Heart disease is a common problem for older adults, and River Oaks Home Care has specialty services that can help patients recovering from heart disease symptoms or the after-effects of treatment. Providing in-home assistance for cardiac disease patients can lead to better health outcomes. It’s estimated that around 25 percent of heart failure patients will be readmitted within 30 days. Many health experts believe that using home health services to ensure patients take their medication and eat appropriate meals can reduce readmission rates and significantly improve health and quality of life for the patient.

Cancer Recovery Home Care

Recovering from cancer treatments can take a toll on an individual, especially older adults. Many patients remain in the hospital or go to a managed care facility as they wait to recover. However, qualified home health aides from River Oaks Home Care can provide cancer patients with the same recovery assistance they would receive at another facility. Most people would prefer to remain in their home, rather than stay in the hospital, so these services benefit older adults recovering from cancer treatments.

Hospice/Palliative Support Home Care

Chronic disease and terminal illness are areas of care that are often handled in facilities such as hospitals and hospices. River Oaks Home Care can help patients during this time by providing hospice home health aids as well as aides trained to provide palliative care. Besides allowing patients to remain in their home environment, this kind of care can reduce the pain from chronic illness and alleviate some of the stresses that come with end-of-life care.

River Oaks Home Care has a staff of highly-trained professionals that can help seniors live more enjoyable lives in their home environment. Seniors maintain their freedom and independence, and family members can feel assured that their loved ones are getting personalized attention.

If you’re interested in learning more about River Oaks Home Care, you can send us a message online or request a free quote for the services you need.

A Home Health Care Company that Cares

Home Care Company that Cares

At River Oaks Home Care, we are dedicated to serving America’s seniors in a caring way, and helping to provide affordable home care services to clients.

If you’re experienced in the home healthcare industry, you’ve probably seen some of the codes of conduct and mission statements that companies frequently advertise. When you see these, it’s a good thing – it means that someone has thought about articulating why we do what we do, and what standards we hold our businesses to, for the sake of the clients and their families.

The context is that it’s important to treat seniors with decency and respect. We understand that those who we serve are in many ways vulnerable to outside forces in their lives. With that in mind, we have created a mission exemplified by the word “caring” that shows how we approach our services:

You can see this in a page on our web site. These principles guide our business philosophy: comfort, affection, respect, integrity, nurturing and generosity.

How do we live this out in operating our home healthcare services?

It starts with staff recruiting and training. We on-board people who understand their mission and the care that our customers require. We then retain these talented individuals to keep our ship functioning well.

We appreciate our staff, and make sure that they know that, and create a work environment that is positive and encouraging. That means a lot to our employees, but it also means a lot to our families because it is this kind of going the extra mile that assures quality. When companies cut corners or fail to reward good work, bad things can happen!

We also adhere to the professional code of ethics of the industry, and always look at how to apply best practices in our business operations.

From non-medical home care to specific kinds of care like Alzheimer’s and dementia care, our home health professionals work on this firm mandate. We understand that we are an arm of the caregiving community that supports families. So we keep in touch with families and understand their needs – we listen to seniors and family members and put together dedicated plans for customer care. We take the time to listen, and do the extra work to safeguard our seniors – because they deserve it!

All of this is incredibly important in today’s world, where frightening stories of nursing home abuse and other problems abound. At River Oaks Home Care, we are dedicated to making sure that none of these types of headlines threaten the security and well-being of our families. Take a look at everything that we offer on our web site and call us with any questions – we look forward to meeting your family and coming up with solutions to adequately support an aging family member in their home.

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